March 9, 2018

Noticing an Issue with the Brake System

        If you start to hear odd noises with your brakes, make sure to try and identify the sound you are hearing when it does it. A grinding noise on braking is usually caused by a lack of brake pad material; the pads and rotors are now metal to metal, with no braking material left. If this noise is present, make sure to schedule an appointment so we can inspect it for you.       Many cars have drum brakes in back, where a shoe stops the car by pressing on the inside of a metal drum. Brake drums, like rotors, get resurfaced once in a while. The cutting bit on the brake lathe removes the old braking surface and leaves a nice new mating surface. When the brake shoes ride on the new surface, they will follow the groove like the needle of your record player follows a track. If the groove is interrupted, the shoes snap back, hitting the backing plate. This happens very quickly, causing a thumping noise that will notice.       The most common brake squeak is caused by wearing pads. If your brakes are squeaking or squealing while driving down the road, but the noise goes away when you press on the brakes, your brake wear indicator is hitting the rotor and causing the noise. The wear indicator is a small metal tab fastened to the brake pad. When the brake pads are worn down and need replacing, this metal tab starts to drag along the rotor, warning the driver of the potential problem. If you hear the noise, make sure to contact us so we can inspect and fix the brakes as soon as possible. Since the brakes are one of the most important part of the vehicle, it is important to keep them working properly. This can improve the safety when you drive.      
March 1, 2018

Windshields Should be Cleared in the Winter

It is a part of winter driving that happens all too often, you will have to get ice off the outside of the windshield, but inside a fog clouds your vision. Clearing a foggy windshield up is not as simple as turning on the defroster. Keeping your window clear in the winter is all about balancing the warmth and moisture inside your car with the cold, dry air on the outside. Too much moisture, and your cabin will reach the dew point, which leads to fog on the window. Until the inside is dry, your glass will remain fogged. There are some tips you can do to help eliminate this issue when driving. You will want to make sure the windshield is clean and dirt is removed. Dirt on the inside of your windshield gives moisture more to cling to. Use a good glass cleaner to remove any film or dirt that may have collected on your windshield. Before turning on the defroster, give your car’s heating system a few minutes to warm up. The air duct temperature needs to reach about 130 degrees before the defrost mechanism becomes effective, but make sure not to leave your car when it’s operating, because your car can get stolen. Once you turn the defroster on, turn it up high. You need to cover 90 percent of the glass with air in very poor weather, like freezing rain or snow and very cold temperatures, in order for the defroster to work effectively. Make sure that you are taking in fresh air from the outside of the car, if it’s snowing, clear the outside vents before pulling out of the driveway, by turning the recirculate button off. If you are recirculating air it can mean that moisture never leaves the cabin and de-fogging the windows becomes very difficult, if not impossible. If the defroster does not work for your vehicle, make sure to schedule an appointment and we can inspect the vehicle for you.